Tidal Power

BRTP is directly addressing these cost drivers with a unique approach that combines the innovative platform developed by Sustainable Marine Energy Ltd., with inexpensive small and robust SCHOTTEL Instream Turbines (SITs).
BRTP is directly addressing these cost drivers with a unique approach that combines the innovative platform developed by Sustainable Marine Energy Ltd., with inexpensive small and robust SCHOTTEL Instream Turbines (SITs).

HALIFAX—The Nova Scotia government is moving ahead with a project that aims to harness the immense power of the Bay of Fundy’s tides, despite the uncertain future of the Cape Sharp Tidal venture.

The Department of Energy and Mines has issued a marine renewable energy permit to Black Rock Tidal Power allowing it to test a 280-kilowatt floating platform for up to six months.

The floating platform will be installed in Grand Passage, between Long Island and Brier Island in Digby County.

The permit will allow the Halifax-based company to learn how its device operates in a marine environment and “take a staged approach to deployment.”

It comes as an Irish technical team works to determine why the rotor on the Cape Sharp Tidal turbine in the Bay of Fundy is not turning.

It says the turbine worked after it was after deployed in July and that it’s not yet clear when the malfunction happened.

The turbine will remain stationary while the OpenHydro team analyzes information gathered from sensors to determine whether it is functional.

Emera remains a shareholder in Cape Sharp Tidal, but recently announced it was pulling out of the project after co-owner OpenHydro filed for bankruptcy protection.

[…]

See Also:

(1) Black Rock Tidal Power (Home)

(Visited 21 times, 2 visits today)