The US At The UN

US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley vetoes an Egyptian-drafted resolution on recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem, at a Security Council meeting in New York City, Dec. 18, 2017. Photo: Reuters / Brendan McDermid.
US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley vetoes an Egyptian-drafted resolution on recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem, at a Security Council meeting in New York City, Dec. 18, 2017. Photo: Reuters / Brendan McDermid.

Just before the UN General Assembly voted to condemn the United States for recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, Ambassador Nikki Haley said: “I’ve often wondered why, in the face of such hostility, Israel has chosen to remain a member of this body.”

A better question would have been: Why has the United States chosen to remain a member?

If the United States were not already a member, would it make sense for it to join? Answering this question requires asking whether it would make sense for the United States to join an organization in which:

1. The United States pays a wildly disproportionate share.

The United States contributes more than three times as much money to the UN as all other permanent Security Council members combined. It contributes more to the UN’s regular budget than 176 other members combined. We contribute more to the UN’s peacekeeping budget than 185 other members combined. We contribute 20 times as much as the 56 members of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, which includes 10 of the world’s top 20 oil producing nations.

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