Remembrance Day

Many of the Canadian soldiers killed in Flanders Fields during the First World War have never been identified and lie in unmarked graves such as the ones seen here in the Passchendaele New British Cemetery.
Many of the Canadian soldiers killed in Flanders Fields during the First World War have never been identified and lie in unmarked graves such as the ones seen here in the Passchendaele New British Cemetery.

The 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War is being commemorated this Remembrance Day but how aware are today’s youth of what happened a century ago?

“The war is taught differently across the country with education being a provincial jurisdiction,” said Canadian War Museum historian Tim Cook.

“And we know from studies that in Quebec, the war doesn’t resonate in the same way. I’m not as concerned about that as some people are. I have three daughters, 14, 12 and ten, (at French Immersion school in Ottawa) they learn about the war. They learn about Remembrance Day. They have a ceremony there. It’s an event that still seems to matter to many Canadians, even if we can’t perhaps remember certain battles or go deep into history.”

Ontario Ministry of Education spokesman Derek Luk said the province’s education act mandates a Remembrance Day service in every school on Nov. 11 (or the preceding Friday if it falls on a Saturday or Sunday) and that the First and Second World Wars are formally introduced in a compulsory Grade 10 history course and children can find out more in optional courses in Grades 11 and 12.

“Students are given many age-appropriate opportunities to learn about Remembrance Day, wars and conflicts, and the contributions of veterans,” said Luk

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