CAF Veteran’s Affairs Attacked

Minister of Veterans Affairs Seamus O'Regan speaks during the Candlelight Tribute for Veterans at the National War Museum in Ottawa on Nov. 5, 2018.
Minister of Veterans Affairs Seamus O’Regan speaks during the Candlelight Tribute for Veterans at the National War Museum in Ottawa on Nov. 5, 2018.

Veterans Affairs is not in the business of taking care of veterans. That’s the inescapable conclusion.

Whatever the motivation behind the inception of benefits for injured veterans was, the current purpose of VAC is to give the appearance of helping veterans, while saving and returning as much funds as possible to the government. The department exists primarily to support politicians in their claims that they deeply care about veterans. In reality, providing for veterans is way down the list.

One need only look at the actual delivery of service to veterans to see: long processing times (which are getting even longer); funds allocated to VAC programs being returned unspent — to both Liberal and Conservative governments; the current government’s plan to restore lifelong pensions will actually save it money; even the way that government will fix an error that takes money out of veterans’ pockets — but refuse to give the money back.

Until very recently, no government was ever open and honest enough to say that veterans are too expensive, even though governments continually find ways to game the system against veterans.

When asked about veterans suing over their lump-sum awards, Trudeau was honest enough to say that veterans suing over payments want more than Ottawa can afford. Honest — in that he no doubt believes that. However, the amount of funds regularly returned unspent from VAC would indicate that there’s enough money already available. Money Canada actually can afford but chooses not to spend.

[Interesting Read]

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