A Large Problem Called Quebec

As Scheer sets out to turn next year’s federal campaign into a plebiscite on Trudeau’s climate change policy, he should expect little or no help from Quebec’s political class.
As Scheer sets out to turn next year’s federal campaign into a plebiscite on Trudeau’s climate change policy, he should expect little or no help from Quebec’s political class.

It is not a Maxime Bernier-led breakaway party that stands to most damage Conservative prospects in Quebec in next year’s federal election but rather some of leader Andrew Scheer’s own promises.

In a keynote speech to his party’s national convention on Friday, Scheer laid out part of his 2019 battle plan. As expected, it borrows heavily from Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s successful recipe, starting with a frontal attack on Justin Trudeau’s national carbon-pricing policy.

One of the first acts in office of a Scheer-led government would be to abolish the federal carbon tax that Ottawa will apply to provinces that fail to come up with measures of their own to meet the emissions-pricing targets set in the national climate change framework.

In line with his Prairies allies, Scheer would pursue a proactive pipeline agenda. It would include a renewed push to resurrect the plan to connect Western Canada’s oilfields to the Atlantic Coast. Last year, TransCanada nixed its planned Energy East pipeline rather than submit it to stringent new climate change standards put in place by the federal regulator.

Scheer argues those standards are designed to stifle the development of new pipelines in Canada. A Conservative government would lower them.

Given their recent internal distractions, chances are Conservative strategists have not been paying a lot of attention to the ongoing Quebec election campaign.

If they had, they would have noted that, in sharp contrast with comparable provincial jurisdictions such as Ontario, British Columbia, New Brunswick and Alberta, the desirability of either carbon pricing or new pipelines is not on the electoral radar.

[…]

See Also:

(1) All’s too quiet on the Quebec electoral front

(2) Scheer defends birthright policy, says ending ‘birth tourism’ objective

(3) It’s Scheer’s party, for better or worse. Australians must be jealous

(4) Welcome to the New Canadian ‘Re-Leaf’ Party

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A life long conservative am I. During those years I have never been able to understand why it is that the party continues to elect such unqualified unconservative liberal-light people to lead it. Harper excepted of course. Think about it. When was the last time the Liberals elected a conservative to lead their party? Duh…..how about never. Correct me if I am wrong.